Safe Winter Driving Campaign

TOP Safe Winter Driving Campaign
Snowplow Truck Speed
WYSIWYG

Snowplow trucks drive slowly – and there’s a good reason for it.

Plow trucks are operated by one person, and travel at 35 MPH or slower when plowing or salting the road. This helps ensure that salt being dispersed stays in the driving lanes and does not scatter off the road. We waste as little salt as possible, saving taxpayer money and minimizing our environmental impact.

Snow Plow

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Echelon Plowing
Echelon Plowing

Echelon plowing is the practice of operating snowplows side-by-side across all lanes of a multi-lane highway to clear snow from several lanes at once. Snow from the lead plow is passed to the following plows until all lanes are cleared. Echelon plowing is the safest and most efficient snow removal method for interstates and other multi-lane highways.

Note: It is extremely dangerous to pass between or around snowplows during echelon plowing operations. Plows have many blind spots and don’t maneuver easily or stop quickly.

The safest place to drive is well behind the plows where the road has been freshly cleared. You might get to your destination later than planned, but you will get there safely.

Echelon Plowing

 
 

Storm Prep and Cleanup
Storm Prep and Cleanup

 
 

PRE-TREATING WITH SALT BRINE

Before some storms, maintenance workers pre-treat the roads with salt brine.

The brine is sprayed onto the road and dries, leaving salt on the highway. The salt activates when the first precipitation hits it, meaning we’re already fighting snow and ice before our plow trucks get on the road. The melting action of the brine helps prevent snow and ice from bonding with the pavement, avoiding hard pack that is difficult to clear.

Salt Brine

WYSIWYG

CLEANUP

When a storm is over and all roads are clear, our jobs are still not done. That’s when we begin pushing back snow banks from along the road to make room for snow from the next winter storm. We also use our equipment to remove snow from medians and other areas that are hard to reach with a plow truck. Drivers should expect to see plow trucks and other equipment on the roads for several days following a storm.

Post-Storm Cleanup

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Don’t Crowd the Plow
Where Are All the Plows?
Where Are All the Plows?
WYSIWYG

Plow operators drive a designated “beat” that can take up to two hours to complete. Shorter beats are designated for high-volume roads, such as interstates. During storms, expect to see snow on the roads.

If a storm is predicted to occur during the morning or afternoon rush hours, plan to leave early or not travel at all. Roads can quickly become congested as traffic slows for bad weather. Remember – if you are stuck in traffic, so are our plows.

I-84

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Safety Tips
Tow Plows
Tow Plow Training
Tow Plow Training
511NY
511NY
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The service features a winter travel advisory system and offers access to more than 1,000 live traffic cameras. An interactive statewide roadmap provides information about construction, crashes and winter road conditions – showing which state roads are snow covered, wet, dry, or closed, as reported by our plow drivers. It’s a helpful resource for commuters and long-distance travelers alike to determine if travel is advisable before heading out on the roads.

Call 511, visit the website or download the free 511NY mobile app from iTunes or Google Play.

511 Mobile App

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Equipment