May 23, 2019

Lake Ontario Flooding Preparation & Resources

TOP Lake Ontario Flooding Preparation & Resources
REDI Commission
WYSIWYG

Governor Cuomo hosted the first meeting of community leaders and the Lake Ontario Resiliency and Economic Development Initiative, or REDI, commission on June 10, 2019. The Governor, the commission and more than 250 state and local officials from communities along the Lake Ontario and St. Lawrence River shorelines gathered in Rochester to develop plans to reduce risk to infrastructure along the lake's waterfront while strengthening the region's local economies, which are heavily dependent on summer tourism. 

Governor Cuomo announced up to $300 million in funding is available for communities impacted by Lake Ontario flooding and local governments will match 15 percent for every dollar the state spends.

At the meeting, local governments began to outline their infrastructure and economic development priorities to state officials who will award funding to projects identified by the REDI commission. Local governments have until Labor Day to submit their projects for consideration.

Guidance for Local Governments

Local governments can use guidance developed by the Department of State's Office of Planning, Development and Community Infrastructure to help improve their resilience to sea-level rise, storm surge, and flooding.

Model Local Laws To Increase Resilience

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REDI Phase 1 - Planning Process
REDI Phase 1 - Planning Process
WYSIWYG

In response to the extended pattern of flooding along the shores of Lake Ontario and the St. Lawrence River, the Resiliency & Economic Development Initiative (REDI) was created to address the immediate and long-term resiliency needs of these areas while also enhancing economic development opportunities and health of the lake. The REDI aims to develop a new vision for rebuilding and enhancing the Lake Ontario and St. Lawrence River shoreline from resiliency and economic development points of view, including protecting critical infrastructure and enhancing natural features that support coastal resilience. 

The first phase of the REDI is a targeted planning process taking place this summer, with the goal to develop a near term understanding of shoreline community needs and existing conditions, including projects in progress or in funding queue, and, through development of conceptual designs and assessments, position applicants for project proposals.  In order to obtain initial feedback about at-risk assets that should be evaluated, the REDI Planning Team is hosting a series of 4 meetings over a period of two months—five identical stakeholder meetings across five regions, one for each region. Each meeting will build upon the last, based on community input, and will result in a plan for each of the five regions to be submitted to the state and evaluated by the REDI Commission for funding and approval of selected projects.

Members of the public may submit input on critical infrastructure and community flood resiliency needs by emailing [email protected]. Please note the applicable county in submitting any feedback or questions.

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